How to transition your baby from formula and rice cereal to solids

Posted on 21 June 2012

The day that your baby begins eating solid foods is a big moment for you and for your little one. But knowing how to transition your baby to this new type of food can be a bit confusing, especially for new moms and dads.

Parenting.com recently released some tips on how mommies and daddies can help their babies make the switch from rice cereal, formula or breast milk to traditional baby food a little bit easier. Babies typically begin eating solids anywhere between four to six months. Although there is plenty information available as to what toddlers and older children should eat, advice regarding how many servings of each food group a day babies should eat is far less plentiful.

According to the website, parents who are transitioning their babies to solid foods should strive to provide them something green at every lunch and dinner. It's also wise for mommies and daddies to incorporate plenty of fruits, like bananas, into their little one's diet as well.

Parenting.com mentioned that grains are traditionally an easy food group for babies to become accustomed to. But Dr. Alan Greene, a pediatrician at Stanford University, says that white rice cereal is a junk food and that parents should do their best to avoid it. He recommends oatmeal or brown rice instead.

Meat should be introduced after babies are six months old, and experts say it's important that parents don't skip out on this food group after this age, as it is a good source of iron. Once little ones begin eating poultry, beef and fish, these foods can be offered anywhere from two days a week to every day. Mommies and daddies should do all they can to avoid spending too much time tracking the servings of each food group their baby is getting, as the goal during this transitional period is to just introduce little ones to new foods with different smells, textures and colors.

As with any big decision regarding your baby, it is always a good idea to do some research and speak with your baby's pediatrician. He or she can answer any questions you may have and also provide you with accurate information that may not be available on the internet.

More Posts

0 comments

Leave a comment

All blog comments are checked prior to publishing